How To Get The Current Epoch Time (Unix Timestamp)

 

Perl time
PHP time()
Ruby Time.now (or Time.new). To display the epoch: Time.now.to_i
Python import time first, then int(time.time())
Java long epoch = System.currentTimeMillis()/1000;
Microsoft .NET C# epoch = (DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime().Ticks - 621355968000000000) / 10000000;
VBScript/ASP DateDiff("s", "01/01/1970 00:00:00", Now())
Erlang calendar:datetime_to_gregorian_seconds(calendar:now_to_universal_time( now()))-719528*24*3600.
OR
element(1, now()) * 10000 + element(2, now()).
MySQL SELECT unix_timestamp(now())
PostgreSQL SELECT extract(epoch FROM now());
Oracle PL/SQL SELECT (SYSDATE - TO_DATE('01-01-1970 00:00:00', 'DD-MM-YYYY HH24:MI:SS')) *
24 * 60 * 60 FROM DUAL
SQL Server SELECT DATEDIFF(s, '1970-01-01 00:00:00', GETUTCDATE())
JavaScript Math.round(new Date().getTime()/1000.0) getTime() returns time in milliseconds.
Unix/Linux Shell date +%s
PowerShell Get-Date -UFormat "%s" Produces: 1279152364.63599
Actionscript (new Date()).time
Other OS’s Command line: perl -e "print time" (If Perl is installed on your system)
ColdFusion (CFML) MX 6.1+ #int( getTickCount() / 1000 )#
Bash Command Line: date +%s

Database Integration – some points to keep in mind

Always Have a Single, Authoritative Source For Your Schema
Everyone should know where the official schema resides, and have a frictionless experience in getting a fresh database setup. One should be able to walk up to a computer, get the latest from source control, build, and run a simple tool to setup the database (in many scenarios, the build process can even setup a database if none exists, so the process is one step shorter).

Always Version Your Database
The common goal is to propagate changes from development, to test, and ultimately to production in a controlled and consistent manner. A second goal is to have the ability to recreate a database at any point in time. This second goal is particularly important if you are shipping software to clients. If someone finds a bug in build 20100612.1 of your application, you must be able to recreate the application as it appeared in that build – database and all.

Never use a shared database server for development work.

Like many conveniences in software development, a shared database is a tar pit waiting to fossilize a project. Developers overwrite each other’s changes. The changes I make on the server break the code on your development machine. Remote development is slow and difficult. Avoid using a shared database at all costs, as they ultimately waste time and help produce bugs.

One Perspective on Improved Software Quality and Reduced Risks

We talk endlessly about improved software quality and reduced risks, but deployable software is the most tangible asset to “outsiders”
such as clients or users. The importance of this point cannot be overstated.